Africa Trip Packing List (2 people, 5 weeks)

A daily blog post sounded like a good idea, and so far it’s been fun. The travel photo blogs every other day have been super easy, as I scheduled them all in advanced up to April. The non-photo posts in between were a way to get me to share other bits of writing I do anyway, things like emails, forum posts, diary entries or tutorials that could easily be made into blog posts with minimal editing.

Today I’ve been super busy with work and getting ready for a 5 week overland truck safari through east and southern Africa. As such, the only writing I’ve done is the packing list. So here it is, as I wrote it, checked it, and packed it, but otherwise in a random order:

new padlock
new blanket

6 soft beanbags
1 large ball
6 clubs

White tape

Travel adaptor
*2
Stereo power * 2
Multi Plug

Goggles, nose clip

coat

Passport
Cards from wallet
Money belt * 2

cash
student ID
Driver’s license

Papers for Kenya – booking voucher with final receipt
Yellow fever cards
passport photos
insurance policy

Photocopies of documents

iPhone *2
iPod Nano
iPad
iPad Charger
cables *2

Sunglasses

Laptop
laptop charger
Crumpler
laptop case

Headphones * 2
Spare headphones

Battery Charger
3 * spare batteries

Camera bag

Camera 500D
Camera 60D
Camera Charger * 2
Spare battery * 2
SD card adapter

Flash
Cable
Clamp
Filters
Umbrella
Stofen
Velcro strap

Wide angle lens
Zoom lens
18-55 lens
Remote switch
IR remote switch

SD cards:
16 GB
16 GB
8 GB
4 GB

GPS tracker (*2?)

head torches

Juliane’s Time Machine
lens case?

Archive video Hard Drive
Archive Africa Hard Drive

Cable for hard drive * 2

Stick drive

Gorrilapod

GoPro Camcorder
GoPro Screen
Camcorder waterproof cases
Tripod Adapter

Binoculars

Pens
Clear plastic bag
Toothbrush * 2
Toothpaste * 2
Razors * 5

Shower Gel * 2

Suncream * 2
After sun

Toilet rolls

Lighter
Washing line

first aid kit
pills
wipes
tissues
quetips

mosquito spray * 4
insect repellant

nail kit
sewing kit
condoms
knife

knives and forks
sporks
cups
bowls
plates
water bottles

sleeping bag
sleeping bag
sheet

pillow
pillow

Luke Clothes:

sandals
boots

scarf
waterproof coat
Warm hat
Fleece

sun cap
sun hat

Swimwear

light jacket coat

black trousers
greybrown trousers

socks * 5
pants * all!
tshirts * 7
short sleeved shirt 2
shorts 3

Wear:
green trousers
black jumper
tshirt
belt

Juliane’s Clothes:

sun hat
sun cap
sandals
sleeping pants
black shorts
sleeveless shirts green * 2
sleeveless shirts white * 2
sleeveless shirt black
sleeveless shirt blue * 3
tshirts white * 3
long sleeved shirt green
thin cardigan
blouse white * 2
blouse green
blouse patterned

blue scarf
pants white cotton * 4
pants white * ?

bikini
sports bra

small socks * 8
longer socks * 3

shorts sandy
trousers (3 quarters)
shorts denim
jeans
linen trousers black

black dress
grey dress
black and white dress
linen skirt black

trainers
walking shoes

fleece


Performing for children in Boca de Valeria, Brazil – January 2011.

A cruise ship was sailing up the Amazon. It broke down. Normally a ship losing power isn’t too bad. You can just float in the ocean until you fix it. On a river, the current is way too dangerous. So the ship dropped anchor and waited for repairs. The repairs took a few days. The people from the nearest scooted over in their little boats to see what was going on. The captain asked them if they would let the passengers visit their village.

And so Boca de Valeria became a regular stop for cruise ships on the Amazon. The passengers take photos of the local kids and animals, and give them a few dollars each. Then the dollars are converted to local reals, pooled together, and over the years it has paid for a new school, community center and church.

I visited twice in 2011, and each time instead of just taking photos and paying dollar notes, I decided to perform a short juggling show for the kids from the village and all those who had come from the villages close by. Bernardo, the internet manager on the Prinsendam, took some photos of me juggling.

Also Bernardo is Brazilian, so he could act as a very handy translator. We got some kids to guide us to the top of a nearby hill. On the next visit I went on a canoe trip, but I’d lost my camera then, so have no photos.

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I love to read comments and feedback about my blog posts. Please email me, I reply to every message: luke@juggler.net


Tip: let a member of the opposite sex help you fill out your online dating service profile.

Based on a true story (for real):

“It wants a profile picture.”

“Use the same one as your Facebook profile, as you look cool with the camera in your hand and the way it covers half your face makes you look mysterious.”

“Really?”

“Hell yeah!”

“What should I put in the ‘I’m really good at’ section?”

“Put the video of you juggling in different places around the world. Girls will love that!”

“Really? I thought it was a bit nerdy.”

“You have no idea, do you?”

“Hmmm, okay. Six things I can’t live without? Well, my laptop, obviously…”

“Don’t say your laptop!”

“Why not? It’s the most expensive thing I’ve ever bought, and without it I wouldn’t be filling out this stupid OkCupid profile… How about ‘I can’t live without hugs’?”

“Perfect.”

“I was joking.”

“Hugs is cute.”

“You should message me if… You want an interesting adventure.”

“I’d message you.”

“The truth is I’m looking for sex.”

“If the girl is also looking for sex, she’ll interpret that as interesting and adventurous sex.”


Pirahna Fishing on the Amazon, Santarem, Brazil – January 2011.

I visited Santarem, a town on the Amazon river. The Amazon is famous for being very big. And it’s famous for being full of piranhas. As a crew tour, we went piranha fishing. Most of the 30 people on the boat caught no fish. Three people caught one piranha each. I caught two. And then one guy caught something like seven. There must have been some kind of technique that he knew, and I hit on randomly.

Santarem is at the joining of two rivers, the Amazon and… um… another river. A blue river. The blue and brown water doesn’t mix right away, and the two different colours flow along for many kilometers. The same thing happens further upstream too, at Manaus, which is the better known Meeting of the Waters.

As for photo quality, I notice that when I’m doing things with other people while traveling, I take way more photos. And those photos are just more vibrant and interesting. Empty photos with buildings in them? Yeah, any one can snap those. But to capture the expressions and laughs and experience of other people enjoying themselves? It makes me try harder to do them justice.

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I love to read comments and feedback about my blog posts. Please email me, I reply to every message: luke@juggler.net

Exit status: 0


Idea: every story is based on a true story.

I recently read A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court, and I noticed that so many of these fantastical stories from the 19th Century are frame stories. I love the idea that the author didn’t make up these stories, but received a manuscript and was just passing it along (Connecticut Yankee), or it happened to their uncle (A Princess of Mars (admittedly not 19th Century)), or they are a reporter just passing on the story of another person (The Time Machine).

Each one of them has some telling detail that convinced the author that the “person” they received the “true story” from was not lying. It could be a bit of technology, or something they noticed, or a fact that they otherwise couldn’t have known.

Any, my simple observation is that any story could, in theory, be given the movie tag line “Based on a True Story” or even “A True Story”.

It works like this:
1. Begin each story with someone sitting down to write or read a story.
2. Then tell the story that they wrote or read.
3. End with a scene showing the person finishing the story.

That’s it! The “Based on a true story” claim is only about the frame story of someone sitting down to either read or write the story within the story. As long as that frame character makes no claims to the verifiable truth of the framed story, you’re good to go.

Of course, they can claim they believe the framed story, but that just means that at some point the reader/writer must claim that, and so it is true, and you’re still good to go.

I might write a script that adds a scene of someone sitting down to read an ebook to the beginning of every novel in public domain, and then publish them all here on my blog.

“”The War of the Worlds by H. G. Wells” by Luke Burrage – A True Story!”

Again, maybe this idea should just stay in my head.


I love to read comments and feedback about my blog posts. Please email me, I reply to every message: luke@juggler.net


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